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Bokashi

Savage Henry
Canalchemist
Savage Henry
Canalchemist

So if you are adding bokashi and maintaining your microherd I would say the rhizosphere would benefit, one of the things to keep in mind is the fermentation process that creates “Bokashi” also creates highly acidic conditions, a pH of 3.5 – 4.5. So bear in mind that this is not only affecting the Nutrients but also the chemistry in the soil.

I do, I think it would, I have made my own Lactobacilli Enochulation, however I use it on my compost pile, I have read wonderful things about bokashi, the important part is what goes into the bokashi, is it all one thing or is it a mix? like all potato peel bokashi would have a lot of potassium and would favour flowering. This is one of the reasons I went back to the bottle, there are tons of products out there for organics growing but unless you are there either doing it yourself it is hard to guarantee if it is in fact a nice balance of all things.

So if you are adding bokashi and maintaining your microherd I would say the rhizosphere would benefit, one of the things to keep in mind is the fermentation process that creates “Bokashi” also creates highly acidic conditions, a pH of 3.5 – 4.5. So bear in mind that this is not only affecting the Nutrients but also the chemistry in the soil.

Seamaiden
Living dead girl

I believe, but don’t hold me to this, that part of the point of bokashi is that you can throw in everything AND the kitchen sink, and end up with a safe and usable composted product.

I would say that if you’re going to boost microbial populations to that degree, be sure to give them enough to eat. That means you’re skipping the soluble fertilizers for the most part and leaning more towards things that actually need to be broken down before being made plant-available. Soil provides these minerals in their microbe-available forms, and so adding something like bokashi makes a lot more sense in soil than in coir. You can, of course, add back many of these things, especially the rock dusts that provide many minerals, to your coir mix, but then it becomes a lot more like soil and that can change how you have to treat it. I found that adding worm castings and rice hulls and handling nutrition through feeding was a lot easier as well as more precise.

If you’d like to try something both quicker and easier, try adding humic or fulvic acids to your fertilizer regimen. You’ll probably find that you need to reduce overall feeding by about one third.

Are you new to growing in coir? My #1 advice is to make absolutely sure those plants are getting Ca from the very beginning, otherwise once you see a deficiency all you can do is play catch-up.

So a couple soil guys I know are mixing bokashi in with their soil mix to "feed the mycorrhizae" and their plants look spectacular. So I started… ]]>