Butterfly Weed Seeds Home Depot

Butterfly Milkweed Seeds – Butterfly Weed SeedButterfly Milkweed just so happens to be a beautiful flower that has long suffered from an unfortunate name. Often known in old-fashioned circles as "Butterfly Weed", it is also sometimes referred to by the more marketing-savvy as "Butterfly Flower". But regardless of the m An effective way to attract monarch butterflies to your garden is to plant milkweed. We have tips on organizations that will send milkweed seeds to gardeners at no charge. How do I germinate butterfly weed seeds? Harvest the seed pods of butterfly weed when the pods begin to split. Seeds can be sown directly outdoors in late fall or started indoors. When sowing

Shipping Schedule

Pre-ordered Bulbs: Pre-orders will not ship immediately, but they will be delivered at the ideal time for planting in your area. Spring pre-orders are placed any time before March 1. Fall pre-orders are placed any time before September 1. For customers who order bulbs in advance, please see the shipping schedule below. Orders containing both seeds and bulbs may be split into multiple shipments.

Pre-Ordered Spring Bulbs & Perennials Shipping Begins
Zones 9 – 12 Mid March
Zone 8 Mid to Late March
Zone 7 Late March to Early April
Zone 6 Mid to Late April
Zone 5 Early to Mid May
Zones 2 – 4 Mid to Late May
In-season orders ship immediately at the time of purchase to all zones until inventory is depleted.

Saffron Crocus & Bearded Iris Shipping Begins
All Zones Late August

Pre-Ordered Fall Bulbs Shipping Begins
Zones 2 – 5 Mid to Late September
Zone 6 Late September
Zone 7 Late September to Early October
Zone 8 – 12 Early to Mid October
In-season orders ship immediately at the time of purchase to all zones until inventory is depleted.

Pre-Ordered Fall Perennials* Shipping Begins
All Zones Mid October
*Amaryllis Bulbs, Hosta Roots, Lily Bulbs, Papaver Roots, Paperwhite Bulbs, Peony Roots & Siberian Iris Roots

Multiple Ship Dates

Your credit card will be charged for the full amount of your order at the time your order is submitted, regardless of the shipping time for your items. If your order requires multiple shipping dates, you will never be charged more than once for shipping charges. This allows us to ship your non-seasonal items to you as soon as possible, as well as allocate our seasonal product for your order.

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For example, a customer places an order in February consisting of 5 Pounds of Wildflower Mix and 50 Darwin Hybrid Tulip Bulbs. The order would be charged in full upon submission, the seed would be shipped immediately, and the bulbs would be shipped at the optimal time in the autumn based on the customer’s zip code.

Here’s How You Can Get Free Milkweed Seeds to Help Monarch Butterflies

Including native plants in your garden is just one way to help the pollinator population rebound.

Andrea Beck spent more than three years writing about food for Better Homes & Gardens before serving as the assistant digital garden editor. Now, she writes about lifestyle topics, including food, garden, home, and health for Hy-Vee’s Seasons magazine. Her work has appeared on Food & Wine, Martha Stewart, MyRecipes, and more. Andrea holds a double degree in magazines and English, with a minor in politics from Drake University.

Yesterday kicked off the first day of spring, which in my mind always signals the return of blooming flowers, chirping birds, and butterflies fluttering everywhere. Aside from helping pollinate wildflowers, I love seeing butterflies every year because they make gardens look so much more magical and full of life. Monarchs are one of my all-time favorites because of their huge, unmistakable black and orange wings. One of the most effective ways to attract more monarch butterflies to your garden is to plant milkweed, and organizations dedicated to their conservation will sometimes send the seeds to gardeners at no charge. Some butterfly and garden enthusiasts have even taken it upon themselves to make accessing the seeds easy for everyone.

A man in Omaha, Bob Gittins, took on a huge role in trying to save the monarchs. According to the Omaha World-Herald, after having trouble finding milkweed plants in stores, Gittins started buying the seeds in bulk from the Save Our Monarchs Foundation in Minnesota. Now, he’s helping other gardeners by giving away the seeds for free. Last year, he sent out 1,500 seed packets.

How to Get Free Milkweed Seeds

If you’d like to take advantage of the free pollinator seeds and sprinkle some in your yard, all you need to do is drop a self-addressed, stamped envelope in the mail to: Nebraska Monarchs, P.O. BOX 642061, Omaha, NE 68164. Gittins will send back milkweed seeds as soon as he can so you get them in the ground.

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I found an organization, Live Monarch Foundation, that also offers free seeds. If you mail a self-addressed, stamped envelope to the Live Monarch Seed Campaign, the foundation will send back 15 butterfly garden seeds, including milkweed, for free. If you include a donation for the foundation along with your envelope, they’ll provide you with 40+ seeds for every dollar you donate.

Common Milkweed Varieties

Typically, Live Monarch Foundation has several varieties of seeds, and they’ll give you seeds that are native to your region. They have a few different hardy varieties of this perennial, including Asclepias syriaca (common milkweed) and Asclepias speciosa (showy milkweed), which can both survive freezing winters after the growing season ends. The foundation also has Asclepias curassavica (tropical milkweed), which grows well in Southern states like Florida, Louisiana, and Texas.

Monarch butterflies lay their eggs on milkweed, and when they hatch, it’s the only plant the caterpillars will eat. That’s what makes it so crucial for helping the next generation hatch each season. And with the monarch population declining, it’s more important now than ever before for us to do our part to help these pollinators rebound.

How to Plant Milkweed Seeds

If you get milkweed seeds for your garden, you can start them indoors in early spring. Growing the plants inside for a few months gives them extra time to mature before transplanting outside. Then, plant the sprouts outside after the last spring frost in your region. In the fall, simply scatter the seeds outdoors; they won’t germinate until they’ve been exposed to freezing temperatures and won’t sprout until next spring. If you’re interested in purchasing your seeds to start, you can find them at most garden supply stores.

While the monarch butterfly population won’t recover overnight, we home gardeners all across the country can do our part to help just by including a few milkweed plants our their yards. Look for them as you’re planning your garden this year, or mail in an envelope to get a few seeds for free. In addition to milkweed, adult monarchs also love nectar-rich plants like lantana, rudbeckia, and yarrow, so you can beautify your garden and help butterflies at the same time!

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How do I germinate butterfly weed seeds?

Harvest the seed pods of butterfly weed when the pods begin to split. Seeds can be sown directly outdoors in late fall or started indoors.

When sowing seeds outdoors, work up the soil in a protected location in early to mid-November. Scatter the seeds over the prepared seed bed and then cover the seeds with approximately 1/4 inch of soil. The cold, moist conditions over winter improve seed germination. Seedlings should emerge in spring. Carefully transplant the seedlings to their permanent locations when the seedlings are 3 to 4 inches tall.

To start seeds indoors, fill a flat with a commercial germination medium (such as Jiffy Mix). Moisten the medium. Scatter the seeds over the surface of the germination medium and lightly press the seeds into the material. Cover the seeds with an additional 1/4 inch of the germination mix. Carefully moisten the additional material. Slide the flat in a plastic bag and place the bagged flat in the refrigerator. Leave the flat in the refrigerator for 4 to 6 weeks. After 4 to 6 weeks, remove the flat from the refrigerator and place it in an area with a temperature of 70 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. Seeds should begin to germinate in 3 to 4 weeks. (If no seedlings appear after 4 weeks, place the flat back in the refrigerator for another 4 to 6 weeks and repeat the process.) Take the flat out of the plastic bag as soon as seedlings appear and place the flat under fluorescent lights in a 60 to 65 degree Fahrenheit location. Transplant the seedlings into individual pots when the seedlings are 1 to 2 inches tall. Continue to grow the seedlings indoors under fluorescent lights for several more weeks. Prior to planting outdoors, place the seedlings outdoors in a shady, protected location and then gradually expose the seedlings to longer periods of direct sun. Plant the seedlings in their permanent locations after they have hardened outdoors for 10 to 14 days.