How To Grow Weeds From Seeds Uk

In this guide, you will learn how to grow weed outdoors, in the sun or in a greenhouse. Check out our 5 step tutorial and start growing today. Growing cannabis in the UK comes with certain climatic challenges. Check our monthly guide to learn how to get the right planning, preparation and seeds. I joined the head of the Feed the Birds campaign as he sowed some seeds along the River Thames.

How to Grow Weed Outdoors: 5 Steps (from Seed to Flower)

Let’s face it—there has never been a better time to start learning how to grow weed outdoors (or in a greenhouse) than today.

There are many areas in the world that are famous for having great sun-grown cannabis, most notably Jamaica, California, Oregon and British Columbia. These 4 places reached legendary status in the growing game and here is why:

Lots of sunlight and high temperatures in the summer.

These are important factors when growing outside, so take that into account when planning your outdoor grow.

Later in the article, we’ll go a bit more in-depth about growing weed in soil and why you don’t see that many hydroponic outdoor grows.

But for now, let’s check out the growing equipment you’ll need for growing cannabis outdoors.

Equipment for growing weed outdoors

Cannabis growing equipment can be split into two types:

  1. Gear that is absolutely essential for growing cannabis
  2. Optional equipment that will help you produce higher yields

In this case, the most expensive thing on your list will be a greenhouse, and greenhouse prices depend on the type of the structure. I strongly suggest you get a greenhouse as it will make things significantly easier, and while you are at it get a good one.

Don’t be afraid to spend $100 to $200 on a good greenhouse—the last thing you want is to find your plants dead because of hale or vermin.

Essential growing equipment:

  • Feminized seeds or clones;
  • Pots;
  • Soil;
  • Fertilizers;
  • Perlite.

Optional growing equipment:

  • Greenhouse;
  • pH meter;
  • Pesticides;
  • Humidifiers and dehumidifiers;
  • Fan.

Which strain is the best for outdoor growing?

Any strain can be grown outdoors, as all cannabis strains were initially grown outside before being brought indoors.

However, not every strain will yield the same results. Some strains are more adept at growing at higher temperatures, while others are used to growing in colder areas, and these plants are usually smaller.

So, naturally we want a strain with good genetics, and that it is traditionally grown outdoors for its potent yield.

Are Cannabis Indica and Cannabis Sativa Really Different?

Best indica strains for outdoor growing

Afghan Kush is one of the most popular Afghani strains. It started gaining in popularity in the ‘90s after US soldiers started bringing seeds home from Afghanistan.

Quickly after, they started crossing them with already established American and Dutch strains, thus the name Afghan Kush.

This strain is unusually tall for an indica, but still not as tall as an average sativa.

Afghan Kush has a decent yield (500-600 grams per plant) seeing how it doesn’t grow over 2 meters (80 inches). Its flowering time is 5-7 weeks. If you decide for this strain watch out for moisture and mold.

The other indica I believe is great for growing outside is Grape Ape, although this one might be a bit harder to grow.

Experienced growers say that this strain is better grown in water as the buds tend to grow bigger with good nutrient management, although growing it in soil works as well.

Some also note that you shouldn’t attempt to grow this strain outside if you don’t have a greenhouse.

Hydroponic Weed Growing Guide: Grow Cannabis at Home (Step by Step)

Best hybrid strains for outdoor growing

Blue Dream is a hybrid cross between Blueberry and Haze, two very well known strains with good lineage and genetics.

Its flowering time is 9-10 weeks, which means that this strain might take a while.

However, don’t give up from growing Blue Dream just yet, as it has a huge upside. If you’ve never trained plants before, you will be able to do so with this one and get an even bigger yield than you might have expected.

Training cannabis plants significantly increases their yield, and this strain reacts well to all types of plant training. Also, Blue Dream can take high levels of nitrogen without burning so you don’t have to go easy on the nutrients.

On average, Blue Dream yields around 600 grams per plant when grown outdoors, with October being the best month for harvesting.

Trainwreck has been around for a minute now, and it is one of the best and easiest strains for growing outside.

It easily grows well over 2 meters and has a very potent yield—one plant can yield as much as 700 grams when grown outdoors.

It takes only about 8 or 9 weeks to flower, and you can also train and top it to further increase its yield. It’s not very susceptible to mold or rot so you should have an easy time growing this bad boy.

Lastly, Pineapple Express has been one of the most-in-demand strains over the last 10 years since the release of the movie that was named after the strain. This strain also takes around 8 to 9 weeks to flower, which is characteristic for crossed strains.

Pineapple Express is reasonably hard to grow in soil, especially outdoors, but the upside once harvested is just ridiculous. Don’t even think about growing this strain outside without a greenhouse as winds are the biggest enemy of Pineapple Express.

How to Grow a Cannabis Bonsai Tree from Scratch (Step by Step)

Best sativa strains for outdoor growing

Sour Diesel is a great pure sativa for growing outdoors because it quickly grows huge and it is fairly resistant to just about everything.

Sour Diesel is known for being more of a weed than a plant, as it can grow uncontrollably, without producing too many buds. You can control this by pruning, training, and topping your plants to keep them from getting out of control.

Also, if growing Sour Diesel outdoors, make sure it’s in a place where you’ll have warm weather until late September or early October, since it usually flowers after 11 or 12 weeks. If you do it right, Sour Diesel can yield around 650-700 grams per plant.

Maui Wowie is a classic Hawaiian strain which is perfect for growing outside. Flowering time is around 9 to 11 weeks and it has extremely big, thick buds and large yields.

Experienced growers say that this plant should be kept at around 25-30℃ and that it can handle high humidity and rain without a problem, so a greenhouse is not necessary for this strain.

Indoor vs outdoor weed growing: Essential differences

Growing cannabis indoors requires a lot of preparation and there are a lot of moving elements that can sometimes be forgotten—like turning your lights on or off.

It is also expensive if you are trying to make a return on investment by growing with high-powered lights to get a bigger yield.

However, the main difference in growing weed indoors and outdoors is in the growing medium, as purely hydroponic systems are basically non-existent in the world of outdoor growing.

Most of the outdoor growing is done in pots with soil, and some even choose to grow their trees from the Mother Earth itself, although I don’t recommend it.

Growing weed directly from the ground is one of the hardest things you can do as you have little-to-no control over your grow unless you plan on digging around your plant every now and then to add nutrients.

Another big difference is that outdoor-grown cannabis usually has lower THC levels as the lack of controlled environment is known to lower the levels of cannabinoids.

Weed grown outdoors is usually a few shades darker than what you’d expect high-grade weed to be, although this also depends a lot on the drying and curing process.

One thing is for sure, indoor grown weed, especially if grown in a hydroponic system, will always have a much stronger skunky smell and taste.

Growing weed indoors requires you to set up everything so that the plant thinks it’s still outside means that you won’t have to do this when growing outdoors, which is another bonus.

Why grow weed in a greenhouse?

Keeping your plants in a greenhouse is a pretty good idea, if you can afford it.

A greenhouse will help you control wind and pests, plus the temperature inside is usually a few degrees higher than the outside, which cannabis plants like.

Without a greenhouse, you risk weather harming your plants, as well as other unexpected things such as uninvited visitors.

I generally strongly advise in favor of getting a greenhouse because the control you get far outweighs the extra money you spend on it.

Greenhouse growing especially makes things easier when growing indica strains.

If you plan on growing Blue Dream or Trainwreck you won’t need it, but consider getting one for Pineapple Express.

If you plan on growing one of the sativa strains I recommended, don’t use a greenhouse as both Sour Diesel and Maui Wowie tend to grow huge and will quickly outgrow it.

How to grow weed outdoors (step by step)

As I already wrote an extensive article (and an eBook) about growing weed in soil (although in that instance I wrote about indoor growing), there isn’t much to be added here.

All the basic things that were mentioned in that article can be applied to this situation as well.

So, if you feel that I’ve skipped some important steps in my step-by-step guide here, feel free to fill in the gaps by peeking at the article linked below.

How to Grow Weed Indoors for Beginners [Follow-Along Guide]

1) Prepare your grow

Make sure to choose a perfect location for your grow as this will have a big impact on the end result.

Keep in mind that you want your plants to get a lot of light, but not too much wind.

You will also need to prepare your pot by mixing Supersoil and Perlite (or something similar) in order to give your soil some air.

Adding a little bit of coco coir will also do wonders for the soil, as it will give roots more space to grow and they will be supplied with oxygen much more.

Now, I’ve also seen people growing in the ground, digging up pits and using them several times over for multiple grows. They reported having twice as big yields as when compared to growing in pots. However, this will expose your plants to numerous problems which can sabotage your grow, such as pests and bigger animals like cats and birds.

Mix 2 parts of your Supersoil with one part Perlite in the pot, as this ratio will give your plants the best access to oxygen through their roots.

2) Germinate seeds

Germinating is when a young plant leaves its seed and starts developing into an “organism” of its own. It is very simple to do this, and the only thing to keep in mind is that healthy cannabis seeds should float in water, and sink after spending some time in the water as they absorb it.

If you still don’t know how, here are 3 ways to germinate seeds.

After you’ve germinated and planted your seeds, all you have to do is wait for the plant to grow.

If you’re going with a clone, put it in a pot with some dirt and, voila, you just potted your first plant.

How to Germinate Weed Seeds: Three Easy Methods

3) Water your plants

Water them whenever you feel that the top of the soil is dry and make sure that the water isn’t collecting at the bottom of the pot.

Make sure you don’t over-water the pot with the seed. Overwatering is one of the biggest mistakes you can make.

Here are my 5 general rules of watering cannabis plants:

  1. Flush soil before planting;
  2. Water whenever you feel that the top of the soil is dry;
  3. Bigger pots — water less often, smaller pots — water more often;
  4. Make sure you have appropriate draining (to avoid overwatering);
  5. Flush soil two weeks before harvesting, and stop adding additives (nutes and ferts).

Never forget to add nutrients and fertilizers to your water when it’s time to do so. If you don’t add a growing fertilizer in the vegetative stage, your plant might not grow enough, or it might grow too slowly.

See also  Og Weed Seeds

If you forget the blooming fertilizer, your plants will have smaller flowers which won’t weight that much, and you won’t have as big a yield as you might have expected.

4) Train your plants

After they’ve grown and started looking like real plants and not just some dandelions, start training plants to get bigger yields.

There are several plant training techniques, however, topping is the most popular one if you’re growing big outdoor plants. Check out the post below for more info.

Monster Cropping: 5 Ways to Increase the Yield of Your Cannabis Plants

Outdoor-specific plants are also perfectly suited for topping, as these strains are known to grow to monstrous sizes. Some strains, especially hybrids with a higher sativa presence, are known to grow extremely tall, easily over 3m (10 feet) tall.

Now, if you were to top these plants, you could easily increase the yield by two or maybe even three times, depending on how skilled you are in training plants.

Having one plant with which you can play around and practice your training techniques will prove to be very much worth your time and effort, as knowing how to train plants is a great skill to have.

You can’t learn this in school, only through practice.

5) Don’t forget pesticides

This is a huge mistake many people make.

Add growing and blooming fertilizer to your water when watering the plants.

You’ll also want to get pesticides in case your plants are harassed by animals, especially insects. Keeping your plants protected is a must, which is why I always say getting a greenhouse is a good idea.

Once you get the hang of how simple growing weed outdoors can actually be, you’ll forget all about wanting to grow it inside, in complex hydroponic systems.

As I’ve mentioned before, cannabis grown in water usually has a stronger smell, and can often taste a bit like the chemicals used for fertilizing the plants. These plants are also usually smaller than outdoor ones and have a bigger yield due to the controlled environment.

Cannabis grown in soil smells much more pungent and has a nice aftertaste. Plants tend to grow huge, sometimes over 4 meters, and even up to 6 meters if kept in the vegetative stage for long enough.

Soil-grown plants can be a bit tough to control or even harvest on your own due to the sheer size of their colas and nugs. I’ve heard stories of people harvesting a whole pound easily off a 3.5m tall plant, so you can see why little investment in plant training can go a long, long way.

Enjoy growing outside and feel free to send us pics of your outdoor grow!

How to grow cannabis outdoors in the UK

Can you grow cannabis outside in the uk? Yes you can. But growers in different parts of the UK face different challenges. A grower in the far north will face completely different challenges to a south coast grower. Some growers will be able to grow feminised outdoor seeds, whereas others will need to focus more on autoflower seeds. Dates of the last spring frost and the first winter frost vary from region to region, you will need to know yours. Local insect pests and threats from grazing animals also vary around the country. This practical guide explains how to grow cannabis in the UK and explains the month by month timeline for outdoor cannabis growers in the UK, boosting your chances of a successful harvest

What’s the legal status of growing cannabis in the UK?

Is it legal to grow cannabis in the UK? Cannabis is still regarded as a Category B drug in the UK, meaning it is illegal to grow, use or possess for recreational purposes. However in November 2018, UK Home Secretary Sajid Javid announced that cannabis would be legal for medical patients with an “exceptional clinical need”.

Since that point, however, only a handful of patients have been able to secure NHS prescriptions for medical cannabis. Private prescriptions can be made but these are too expensive for most people.

UK recreational and medical cannabis users are largely fatigued with the slow rate of change for UK laws compared to other countries in Europe and around the world. As a result, many UK cannabis users simply ignore the law and grow their own cannabis. A few well grown outdoor plants could provide a years worth of cannabis…

Which of these four types of climate do you live in?

The UK has a temperate oceanic climate, occupying mid-Atlantic latitudes from 49° to 61°N in western Europe. The close path of the jet stream ensures that the weather is changeable. The average annual rainfall is around 1.4 metres with around 130 rainy days each year. On the other hand, there are around 1500 hours of sun per year across the UK, thats around 4 hours per day on average. But which of the 4 main UK regions do you live in?

  • South East: The South Eastern part of the UK can have cold, sharp winters, But summers can be sunny, dry and pleasant with plenty of warmth. Sometimes warm air masses from continental Europe can keep summers dry with occasional heat waves and 30ºC temperatures. Summers can also be grey and cool! South-east UK encompasses Norwich, Cambridge, Portsmouth and of course London. Growers in the South East find it possible to grow a wider range of feminised seeds than growers in Northern England.
  • South-West: The South Western area of the UK often sees mild but wet winters. Summers are often warm but with plenty of Atlantic weather blowing in cloud and rain.The mild conditions allow a longer growing season than in possible in more northern regions. Includes South Wales, Cardiff, Exeter, Cornwall, Plymouth, Southern Wales etc. Just like South-East UK, growers in the South West will also find it possible to grow a wider range of later-finishing outdoor feminised strains than growers in northern England or Scotland.
  • North-west: Cannabis growers in the north-west experience cool winters and summers which tend to be cooler and greyer than those further south. Prevailing Atlantic winds can bring rain and wind pretty much all year round. The North-Western region includes areas such as Northern Ireland, Northern Wales, and Western Scotland as well as areas like Greater Manchester, Merseyside etc. Growers in this region may find late season weather in September and October less friendly for growing slower blooming outdoor strains. Growers need to be selective about the feminised outdoor strains but will get good results with autoflower seeds.
  • North East: Just like the North West, growers need to be mindful of climate limitations and the shorter grower season compared to growers in the warmer south. Winters can be cold, spring can be slow to arrive and the summer isn’t always as long as locals would like. Some outdoor feminised strains can be grown such as the tough Frisian Dew. But many outdoor growers also rely on autoflowers which can deliver guaranteed harvests even in shorter Scottish summers. The North East includes areas such as Yorkshire, Tyneside, Northumberland and Scotland.

What does your cannabis grow calendar look like?

It’s difficult to give precise guidelines for every city and grow location in the UK. But by generalising around the four main regions you may be able to get a rough idea of your local challenges. It may help you to conduct some internet research on weather specifics for your grow location, such as typical last frost dates in Spring etc.

What’s the best soil to grow cannabis in UK? If your local soil type is too poor (e.g. too sandy) then simply supplement it with supermarket soil and some grow additives – fish/blood/bone meal, rotted manure, worm castings, seaweed etc.

January/February

Many UK outdoor growers ignore January and February. But the good long reaching views and lack of leaves on trees, undergrowth and bushes can make this a great time to go scouting for possible future grow locations.

A winter walk along the river banks, through the fields and in the countryside can reveal promising future guerrilla grow locations which could be adapted to grow cannabis, UK winters have their uses!

One other useful activity at this time of year is the chance to dig the ground thoroughly. This allows you to remove any big roots, stones etc from the ground and it aerates the soil. You can also take the opportunity to dig in some well rotted manure, supermarket soil or soil improvers/fertilisers into the soil.

March
Day length March 1st: 11 hours
Average temperature: 3–10°C

March is often a time of excitement and anticipation for UK guerrilla growers. When growing cannabis, UK growers often want to germinate their seeds as early as possible.

It’s not unknown for the UK to have some great sunny and warm spring weather in March. This can lull UK growers into a false sense of optimism and cannabis seeds may be germinated a few weeks too early to be planted outdoors. Usually the time is better spent preparing your outdoor grow locations. Remember, several guerrilla grow plots are often preferred just in case you have bad luck at one of them. ‘Rippers’ (grow thieves) are a common threat, as are the nuisance of dog walkers and ramblers stumbling upon your grow.

Preparing the soil in your plot is one of the typical March activities. You may want to remove weeds and add some soil, compost or well rotted manure. If you add fresh manure, do it at the end of the previous growing season so it has time to be broken down by the soil over winter (otherwise it could burn the roots of your seedlings)

Greenhouse cannabis growers often use March to conduct a thorough greenhouse clean. Perhaps with a power washer to ensure the greenhouse is spotless. Clean the glass and remove debris to make it as clean as you can.

If you are lucky enough to be growing in areas like the Channel Islands you may want to germinate your cannabis seeds and consider an early start. But for most of the rest of the UK, it’s still a little too early to be germinating your cannabis seeds. However, if you have an indoor area to germinate your cannabis seeds and grow them under artificial lights, then this could be the time to get going. By germinating your feminised seeds (or autoflower seeds) early you give the seeds a head start and should have larger plants with heavier final yields.

But remember that you may not be planting your seedlings outdoors until May (or perhaps April in a greenhouse) so don’t rush and germinate your seeds too early at the first sign of a sunny day.

April
Day length April 1st: 13 hours
Average temperature: 5–13°C

April often heralds the start of Spring for many in the UK. Mini heatwaves in April are not unknown, though over-ambitious outdoor growers should note that snow fall and frosts are still commonplace for several weeks to come. Spring flowers are making the most of the longer daylight hours and warmer daily maximum temperatures.

Some growers, especially those in warmer southern regions, may be tempted to reach for their cannabis seed stash and germinate some seeds. Realistically however, most growers won’t want to risk putting their seedlings outdoors in April weather with the possibility of wintery showers always present. Instead, growers often keep their seedlings indoors (or in heated greenhouses/poly-tunnels) for a few weeks until the threat of bad weather has fully passed.

When growing cannabis, UK outdoor growers may also want companion plants nearby. These tend to attract helpful insects and deter pests. Peppermint, yarrow, coriander, and marigold may help in this respect.

May
Day length May 1st: 15 hours
Average temperature: 8–16°C

Warmer southern regions as well as coastal areas often see their last frost in early May. Further north, you may have to wait a few weeks longer before considering putting your plants outdoors. May is the month when many UK growers like to get their cannabis plants outside.

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Your plants may have been indoors under artificial lights for several weeks. Allow them to gradually acclimatise to outdoor temperatures for a few hours each day. When you do plant them outside, you can place the plants directly in the earth or leave them in containers. When rooted directly in the soil the roots will have unlimited growth space and this can allow large plants 2-3m tall. Or you can leave the plants in containers, but this will mean you have to ensure sufficient water. Plants in containers can be moved in emergencies, even if they don’t produce quite the same large monster plants that can grow when rooted directly in the earth.

Hot weather is also possible in May, so greenhouse growers may want to ensure sufficient ventilation. Final plant health is heavily dependent on the soil and nutrition which you provide. If you can ensure a healthy living soil, perhaps with added mycorrhizal fungi and beneficial bacteria the plants will benefit.

Some growers, with an eye to the future, will consider a light top soil dressing of worm castings, compost, compost tea or seaweed just to ensure that future nutritional needs are met. Others will add some slow release organic nutrients such as BioTabs to the soil to ensure healthy future growth. You may also wish to get some less hardy companion plants such as Chamomile going to help deter pests later in the year.

Once your outdoor plants are in position, you should protect them. Some growers use chicken-wire (garden wire mesh fencing) around their plants to protect them from deer, rabbits etc. You can use tent pegs to pin down the fencing and stop rabbits getting underneath. The most determined UK cannabis growers will also plant a perimeter of thorny brambles around their plots to deter grazing animals, dog walkers, hikers etc.

For many growing cannabis, UK slugs and snails are a massive pest. Slug/snail pellets are often repeatedly applied around the plants in generous quantities to prevent your plants being decimated by them.

June
Day length June 1st: 16.5 hours
Average temperature: 11–19°C

The threat of frost has gone (apart from some Scottish areas) and summer has arrived. With long days, your plants should establish themselves and start to thrive.

Occasionally June can be very hot. You may need to check rainfall locally and for the next 2-3 months consider transporting water to your plants in the unlikely event of a persistent drought.

Be sure to remove any weeds and don’t be afraid to chop down surrounding vegetation which threatens to rob your plants of valuable sunlight. Re-applying a layer of mulch can deter weeds from getting established and it doesn’t harm to reapply slug/snail pellets.

Those growing cannabis in the UK may also consider LST (low stress training) for tying down particularly tall plants. June is a good time to start, before the plants get too large to easily manipulate.

July
Day length July 1st: 16.5 hours
Average temperature: 13–22°C

Growing cannabis in the UK is great fun in July. Warm sunny weather is in plentiful supply and you may want to keep an eye on rainfall. Usually UK rain is never far away, even in July, but in drought you may need to transport water to your plants if there has been a few dry weeks. The long sunny days are ideal for cannabis. Growth above and below ground is in full flow.

Greenhouse cannabis growers may see 30ºC temperatures. Ensuring sufficient water is vital. Check for signs of pest infestation and also check for nutrient deficiencies. If you are growing in good quality, moist, nutritious soil then you shouldn’t see any issues. But it never does any harm to continually monitor the health of your plants.

One useful tip for those growing cannabis in the UK countryside is to avoid making a clear and obvious track to your plant location. This may simply encourage curious walkers to wonder why a new trail has emerged. Instead, it can be wiser to visit your outdoor grow location only when necessary. If possible, you may also wish to have different approach routes to your grow location to minimise the chance of creating an obvious pathway.

Some outdoor growers like to try to control surrounding vegetation throughout the summer. In particular they like to stop nearby trees and bushes from taking sunlight from their cannabis plants. Outdoor pests such as aphids, whitefly etc can be a nuisance though they can be tackled with traditional methods as well as predatory insects (ladybirds etc).

If you had good weather and planted your autoflower seeds early enough, you may be able to harvest your first autos in July.

August
Day length August 1st: 15.5 hours
Average temperature: 13–21°C

As August progresses, daylight hours and temperatures start to drop. The cannabis plant senses the reducing daylight hours and you may notice your photoperiod feminised plants are in bloom.

Autoflower plants are often ready to harvest around August. Many autoflower growers feel that they get particularly potent harvests since their buds are able to ripen under full summer sunlight.

Many that grow cannabis outdoors in the UK have found autoflower seeds are a great way to complement their normal photoperiod crop. What’s more, the autoflower harvest is much more likely to succeed since the mid summer weather is significantly more reliable than the weather in late September or early October.

Many that grow cannabis in the UK like to add extra nutrition in August to allow for a healthy bloom process. Seaweed fertilisers are popular, so is fish/blood/bone meal, worm castings etc. But if your soil is good quality it may not be absolutely necessary to add extra nutrients.

Humidity can be an issue when buds are starting to develop, but there is little that you can easily do to control it. Just ensure that you are selecting good quality outdoor cannabis seeds with reasonable resistance to mold. It also helps to select grow sites that have plenty of direct sunlight, especially early in the day. This helps drive away excess moisture from the plants and minimise mold/bud rot issues.

September
Day length September 1st: 13.5 hours
Average temperature: 11–18°C

Especially in the north, wet and windy weather is already becoming more and more common place. Many that grow cannabis in the UK find September and October to be the most critical months.

A few weeks of good weather at this time of the year can be the difference between success and failure for crops of outdoor feminised photoperiod strains. Most autoflower strains have already been harvested, but photoperiod outdoor strains will still be building their terpene profile and fattening up the buds.

Some southern growers will be able to harvest their photoperiod plants in September. Northern growers may need to wait a few more nervous weeks and hope the October weather stays good enough.

October
Day length October 1st: 11.5 hours
Average temperature: 8–14°C

October usually marks the end of the growing season unless the country has got lucky with a rare ‘Indian summer’ (which means a particularly warm Autumn/Fall). October weather is often cold, wet and windy.

Hopefully you didn’t choose any late blooming Haze genetics! Most growers like to get the plants harvested during October before the weather really goes downhill.

Growers in Scotland and the far north will be mindful of the first winter frosts arriving. Mold and bud rot are a constant threat and there are no guarantees of successful harvests at this late stage in the season. Strain selection is particularly important for outdoor growers in countries with UK-like weather.

If outdoor photoperiod feminised seeds are simply too risky in your specific climate then consider focussing more on autoflower seeds. In the UK, most autoflower seeds grow from seed to harvest outdoors in around 100-110 days. This is slower than indoor auto growing due to the weather, temperatures and reduced light hours. Autoflower seeds also tend to remain around a metre tall, making them easier to hide than some of the 3m tall photoperiod strains.

November
Day length November 1st: 9 hours
Average temperature 4-10ºC

If you get lucky with a warm dry autumn in Southern UK you may still be able to harvest some late blooming plants. Of course there are no weather guarantees so late in the UK outdoor season.

But if the weather hasn’t deteriorated too much, and perhaps with the aid of some shelter (e.g. a glass roof) it may be possible for some lucky southern UK growers to harvest something.

Failing that, November could be a month to tidy up your outdoor grow locations for the following year. You may want to dig in some manure ready for the following grow season

December
Day length December 1st: 8 hours
Average temperature: 2-7ºC

December is a good month to go scouting for possible new grow plots. The lack of vegetation and leaves make it easier to survey the landscape for possible secure grow locations. It’s also a great month to kick back, relax and enjoy the harvest which should be nicely dried and cured!

Growing photoperiod vs autoflower cannabis in the UK

Cannabis seeds that grow in uk climate need to finish inside the short growing season. One of the main challenges for those growing cannabis in the UK is selecting strains that will finish in time. If you want to grow cannabis outdoors, UK growers can choose between autoflower seeds and photoperiod feminised cannabis seeds.

How to grow autoflowering cannabis in UK? Autoflower seeds have a faster growth cycle and they remain shorter (around 1m tall) than photoperiod feminised strains. But autoflower seeds also tend to yield a little less, which is natural since they have a shorter growing cycle.

Photoperiod feminised seeds tend to take 5-6 months to complete their outdoor grow cycle. This means that you may not be harvesting until the changeable October weather arrives. But you will often have larger plants and heavier harvests.

The shorter your grow season, the more that autoflower seeds will appeal. Many outdoor cannabis growers in the UK have several grow locations and use a mix of autoflower seeds and feminised seeds. Some northern growers prefer to avoid the risk and worry of photoperiod feminised seeds and grow autoflower seeds instead. Often they will have staggered start dates for their auto plants so they are harvesting gradually throughout the summer.

Many UK outdoor cannabis growers will germinate their cannabis seeds indoors and give them the first few weeks under artificial indoor light, e.g. 18-20 hours per day. They do this regardless of whether the seeds are autoflower seeds or feminised seeds. By giving the seedlings indoor light for the first few weeks the plants get the best possible start and avoid the threats of outdoor weather/pests while they are at their most vulnerable.

How many cannabis plants can i grow in UK?

How many cannabis plants can i grow in UK? Unless you have a licence to grow cannabis in the UK, then you can’t legally grow any. Grow your own cannabis in the UK and you are in breach of the law.

However, if you are growing a few plants outdoors the Police are unlikely to ever be able to link plants to any specific grower. They don’t have the resources for 24 hour surveillance for a small plot of autoflower plants.

Most outdoor growers don’t worry about the legal aspects of growing.

What are the best cannabis seeds for the UK climate?

How to grow cannabis outdoors in the UK? You will need good local knowledge of your climate, first frost dates etc. It also helps if you have some prior knowledge of which strains will grow well at your latitude/location. In climates like the South East and South West you should be able to grow photoperiod strains like Frisian Dew and perhaps other strains too.

Some, but not all, of the Dutch Passion outdoor seed collection can be grow in the UK. But much depends on the specific climate in your region. A lot also depends on the specific year you choose to grow in. Some years (admittedly not many of them) have long warm autumns which will allow growers in Northern regions to grow a selection of outdoor feminised strains such as Frisian Dew, Hollands Hope, Durban Poison, Shaman, Passion #1.

See also  Bishop's Weed Seed

But the UK weather is so changeable that you may be able to finish blooming a particular strain one year but not the next. UK cannabis growers simply can’t rely on the weather in the way that growers in warmer countries can. That’s also the same reason why cannabis seed companies just can’t guarantee results from their strains.

That’s why growing autoflower seeds has become so popular with UK growers. The seeds should always finish in time. Yields from autos may be smaller (than photoperiod strains) but the plants are fast and easy to grow. They also tend to remain short and bushy – ideal for hiding behind bushes, nettles and plant life.

The following strain suggestions may be useful for UK growers:

Frisian Dew. A solid, proven photoperiod feminised outdoor strain which grows well in UK conditions. She is usually ready to harvest in early October. Grows well as far north as Northern England. Can finish bloom further north in mild autumns. One of the preferred and most recommended strains for growing cannabis in UK.

Durban Poison. Perhaps better suited to South East and South West regions in order to finish in time. This is another proven outdoor photoperiod feminised strain which grows well outdoors. Durban Poison seeds are part of the Dutch Outdoor seed collection. This is well worth browsing, all the strains in this collection grow well at Dutch (and similar) latitudes.

Frisian Duck. With the unique leaf shape Frisian Duck seeds are ideal for outdoor growers wanting a stealthy, self-camouflaging photoperiod feminised outdoor strain. Also available in autoflower seeds as Auto Duck.

Auto Mazar. This tough and resilient auto grows well in UK conditions. Outdoors she takes around 100-110 days to finish and grows well throughout the UK. It’s worth adding that any of the Dutch Passion autoflower seeds collection should be able to grow and finish inside even a short northern UK summer.

Auto Banana Blaze. This tough Afghani Kush autoflower seed produces heavy harvests with a unique sweet banana taste. Give her a good summer and she can really deliver heavy harvests. A solid and reliable autoflower for growing cannabis in the UK. Part of the Afghani Kush seed collection.

Growing cannabis in the UK really is easy

The diverse, changeable and unpredictable weather can mean that no two UK grow seasons are exactly the same. That can make it difficult to have a preferred strain which will always deliver, year in year out.

Understanding the limits of the grow season at various UK latitudes and locations is your starting point. From there, you should be able to grow autoflower seeds outdoors no matter where you are in the UK.

Many in more southerly locations will also be able to finish blooming photoperiod feminised outdoor strains too, though there are no guarantees particularly north of the Scottish border. Whatever you choose to grow, good luck and choose your cannabis seeds wisely!

Activists Are Planting Weed in Public All over the UK

Historically, British cannabis campaigners haven’t had a lot of luck when it comes to the battle for legalization. For whatever reason, politicians don’t seem to pay much attention to the thousands of stoner activists who gather in Hyde Park every year to get high in the rain, and all the other protests and petitions—often organized by different groups throughout the country—have mostly been too small to even generate any media interest, let alone bring about meaningful change.

However, since other places—notably Uruguay and the couple of newly weed-friendly American states—started decriminalizing and legalizing, British activists have stepped it up, uniting previously fractured groups together under the UK Cannabis Social Clubs banner. The most recent action to come out of the UKCSC camp is an initiative called Feed the Birds, which basically involves people up and down the country planting cannabis seeds in public places in the hope that it will open a dialogue about Britain’s current marijuana laws.

Last week I met up with “Finn,” who fronts Feed the Birds. We walked along the Thames while he planted more seeds and explained the reasoning behind the campaign.

VICE: Hey, Finn. So what exactly is Feed the Birds?
Finn: It’s a collective of like-minded individuals who think that this a good way of raising conversation and awareness around prohibition and the current laws. By planting these seeds in public, we’re really showing the public firsthand that the laws have failed. We’re also creating a nationwide peaceful guerrilla protest that can run 24/7.

Also, there are an awful lot of protest groups out there, but there isn’t one group that covers all the areas [of cannabis use], such as recreational, medicinal, and the sustainable industry surrounding hemp and cannabis. Feed the Birds gives everyone a platform so we can all work together for the same cause.

How are you hoping the campaign will help to change the cannabis laws?
By raising the debate, showing people it can grow publicly in Britain—and very easily. The UK has a fantastic climate for weed to grow. It also gives people who have a lot to say the chance to get out there and take a physical role in protesting the laws, instead of sitting behind a computer screen preaching on sites like Facebook. We also want to create a go-to place for easy access to factual, scientific information about hemp and cannabis, which is really important—people need to understand and be educated on the matter to make the right choices.

Every plant on the walk from Embankment to London Bridge had been pulled, so Finn started planting more.

And what are the benefits of giving these people seeds?
By giving people seeds, we’re giving them a bit of freedom. From medicinal to recreational, users are very much dependent on the black market. By giving them seeds, within three months they should be completely independent; therefore they shouldn’t have to turn to street dealers. I think that’s the responsible attitude to have.

Who’s participating in Feed the Birds?
People who are heavily involved are the cannabis clubs in the UK. We’re also aware of lone cells doing it—people who were doing it long before Feed the Birds came about and have now joined us. We get a variety of different participants; from gardeners to bankers to lawyers, there are an awful amount of people who are actively interested in helping.

Another plant along the Thames

How can new people get involved?
There are many ways you can participate—maybe something as small as sharing our Facebook posts, to even contacting us or your local cannabis club to get some hemp seeds and start planting them around your local town.

What seeds are you using?
We’re only using cannabis seeds—we had our hemp shipment postponed for “unknown” reasons. We’ve been giving out specific strains for specific regions. For example, in Scotland we’d give them a strain that would do well against cold and mold, and with a shorter flowering period. That’s also why the seeds were shipped north a little later than they were in the south—the seasons are delayed by a week or two sometimes. There are a lot things you have to accommodate for.

These plants reached a healthy size before being pulled.

Which strains have you been handing out?
We’ve been giving out three strains: a Jamaican one, Nanda Devi—which is Indian—and another from the Himalayas. Medicinal users have been getting all sorts of auto-feminized seeds. A lot of the seeds that have been given out have an ancestry based in the UK; most are locally sourced and organic.

Why are the medicinal users given autos?
Because they’re a lot less effort to deal with. If someone who needs some medicinal cannabis is struggling to get started, they can plant it and the plant will do most of the work. Working with an easier variety will give them a firm grasp on how to grow that plant.

Seeds donated by a supporter of Feed the Birds, including White Widow, Dutch Passion, Weird Sleeve, Smelly Berry, and Black Sugar

Right. Is Feed the Birds funded in any way? Or is it just run with the help of the UK cannabis community?
We need more funding—we don’t have any funding at all. The only capital we’ve been able generate is from selling T-shirts on a Kickstarter page. So we’re self-funded. The activists fund it themselves, which is fantastic for many reasons, and most of our seeds come through donations.

How many seeds do you reckon you’ve given out so far?
Millions? Honestly, I couldn’t give you a true figure.

Have you had much opposition?
Not really. The police haven’t launched anything negative against us. I think they’re probably under too many time constraints to focus on people growing these plants in public, but a lot of the plants have been pulled.

A weed plant sprouting on a busy London street

Any idea who’s been doing that?
It could be anybody—the public, the police, or someone actively hunting down our plants—but we haven’t actually witnessed people pulling the plants out firsthand.

Have you seen many people interact with the plants in other ways?
Yeah, we’ve seen people going up to the plants and recognizing them straightaway, which always brings a smile to their face. We were all a bit more serious while planting them, but it seems to mostly be making people laugh. Quite simply, it must strike them as absolutely ridiculous that the current laws are actually failing right in front of their very eyes.

Cannabis growing in Central London

Are there any planting spots you’re focusing on in London?
Yup, there are. All sorts of public spaces have been done already, all across London and the UK. I think in the month to come, when the plants start maturing, we’ll start seeing a lot more coverage. Also, to my knowledge, we’ve had a lot of the guerrilla cells targeting politicians’ houses. We’ve also had reports that there’s a grow on property owned by the Crown. Hopefully we’ll see something come from that in the next couple of months.

Where do you see Feed the Birds going in the next year or so?
Ideally, I’d like there to be a really high-functioning website that will produce a lot of information to teach people a little more about the positive aspects of reintroducing hemp into the environment. I’d like it to become more of a political discussion. I see this moving forwards by effectively captivating the politicians’ imaginations in terms of what the industry could possibly become. The hemp industry was huge in Britain, and it seems that the argument [for its legalization] does touch on many different political subjects, such as the economy, the environment, communities, and medicine. They’re all very important topics and really should be addressed.

As far as Feed the Birds goes, I think as soon as prohibition comes to an end, we’ll quietly merge into the background and get back on with our normal lives. As soon as the medicinal users and recreational users are no longer persecuted for wanting to have an alternative to alcohol or pharmaceutical drugs, we’d know that we’d done our job properly in informing and introducing the public and the government to the benefits of hemp and cannabis.

While Feed the Birds might still be in its early stages, any action that could eventually help reform cannabis laws in the UK—making the country a ton of money and potentially helping to ease the suffering of the sick—is surely a good thing. If you want to get involved yourself, you can get in touch through the Feed the Birds Facebook page.

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