Categories
BLOG

weed heartburn

Connect. Discover. Share.

Get the most out of your experience with a personalized all-access pass to everything local on events, music, restaurants, news and more.

Enter your email or sign up with a social account to get started

Already registered? Login ›

The independent voice of Denver since 1977

  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism

Support the independent voice of Denver and help keep the future of Westword free.

Recommended For You

  • House of Representatives Approves Ending Marijuana Prohibition
  • Ask a Stoner: Does a Lighter Flame Kill Pipe Germs?

Ask a Stoner: Does Marijuana Affect Acid Reflux?

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Dear Stoner: Does smoking weed make acid reflux worse? I’ve noticed that my chest burns sometimes after smoking.
Timmy Tibs

Dear Timmy Tibs: This doesn’t totally land in the “unanswerable” category, but it’s got one foot in it. There’s evidence that smoking can increase gastroesophageal reflux (acid reflux) and heartburn, and there’s limited evidence that cannabinoids can help with acid irritation in the stomach — but we could find no studies that specifically deal with pot smoke and its effects on stomach acid.

Related Stories

Ask a Stoner: I Need Healthier Edibles for My Post-Workout

Why Colorado Tokers Love THC Bomb

Vegan Edibles: Four Great Websites for Pot-Infused Recipes

Smoking of any kind can worsen your acid reflux problem. Smoking relaxes the lower esophageal sphincter (not that kind of sphincter), which means stomach acids can rise up more easily in your esophagus, causing heartburn. The munchies can also contribute to your acid reflux, as many of the foods and drinks associated with post-pot smoking can be very acidic, including coffee, soft drinks and many condiments and sauces.
However, consuming cannabinoids in ways other than smoking could help the condition, according to David Love, a physician based in North Carolina. “If used for this indication, it would be more logical to take the cannabinoid by oral intake rather than by smoking,” he says, implying that edibles or tinctures could actually decrease acid reflux without the smoke irritating your body.

  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism

Support the independent voice of Denver and help keep the future of Westword free.

Take note of your diet on days that you smoke cannabis, both before and after smoking. If there’s little acidity in it, maybe your body doesn’t react to smoke as well as it used to. You could always pop a couple of antacids or take ginger pills during the day if you plan on smoking later that night.

Have a question for our Stoner? E-mail [email protected] or call the potline at 303­-293-­2222.

Keep Westword Free. Since we started Westword, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Denver, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who’ve won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism’s existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our “I Support” membership program, allowing us to keep covering Denver with no paywalls.

Does smoking marijuana hurt or help your acid reflux? Our Stoner answers.