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Weeds Act – Frequently Asked Questions

Table of Contents

What recent changes have been made to the Schedule of Noxious Weeds?

Effective January 1, 2015, the following plants are being added to the Schedule of Noxious Weeds. Adding these weeds to the Schedule of Noxious Weeds will provide another tool for weed inspectors to control these non-native plants to minimize interference with agriculture or horticulture.

Effective January 1, 2015, the following plants are being removed from the Schedule of Noxious Weeds.

Please refer to OMAFRA Publication 75, Guide to Weed Control for information on management strategies for various weeds including noxious weeds.

Why is this change being made?

Nine weed species are being removed from the Schedule. Some of these species are considered a food source for pollinators, such as bees (e.g., wild carrot, goat’s-beard, scotch thistle, nodding thistle, yellow rocket, and tuberous vetchling). These and other species that are being removed from the Schedule are no longer considered significant threats to agricultural or horticultural production and can be managed through modern management practices.

Nine weed species are also being added to the Schedule. This is to address the issue of new and emerging weed species of concern and to provide another tool for weed inspectors to control these non-native plants to minimize interference with agriculture or horticulture.

What do I need to do?

If you are in possession of one of the weeds on the Schedule of Noxious Weeds and it is negatively impacting agriculture and horticulture lands then you must destroy it. If you feel that your agricultural or horticultural land is being negatively impacted by noxious weeds, contact your local Weed Inspector.

Your local municipality, region, district or county can provide you with contact information for the Weed Inspector for your area. Alternatively you can call the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300 and they can provide you with a contact.

Where do I get more information

A list of all weeds designated as noxious under the Weed Control Act can be found in Regulation 1096, below and on the Ministry’s website (*Please note that this list will be in effect from January 1, 2015 onwards).

OMAFRA ‘s Ontario weed gallery provides pictures, descriptions and lots of information, including habitat and species information on over 170 weeds. OMAFRA’s Publication 75, Guide to Weed Control provides information on management strategies for various weeds including noxious weeds.

How do I contact my local area or municipal weed inspector?

Your local municipality, region, district or county can provide you with contact information for the Weed Inspector for your area. Alternatively you can call the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300 and they can provide you with a contact.

Why does Ontario have the Weed Control Act?

The intent of the Weed Control Act is to reduce:

OMAFRA Crops

Lawn care calendar

Quick facts

It is important to schedule lawn care maintenance during times that match the life cycle of the turfgrass.

  • Do not add fertilizer too early in the spring. This may encourage the grass to grow during a time when it should be slow or dormant.
  • Do not spray to control weeds when temperatures are warm. This increases the likelihood of damaging the lawn.
  • Do not fertilize in hot mid-summer months. This can cause irreversible damage to your lawn.
  • Manage how much water you use and water lawns at the right time to keep them healthy.

Minnesota lawns of cool season turfgrasses bear the stress of changing weather and can survive harsh winters.

These grasses endure throughout the seasons because they grow rapidly during spring and fall when temperatures are cool and then become inactive during the heat and drought of summer.

A sustainable lawn care routine should support this natural life cycle of cool season grasses.

Seasonal plant growth cycle

In early spring, roots are long and full of nutrients stored from the fall. Shoots, the part of grass visible above ground, use this stored energy for growth.

In warm summer temperatures, leaf and root growth slow down. Plants rest during times of heat and drought. Roots can be damaged when soil temperatures are above 85°F.

In the fall months shoots start to grow again and nutrients are stored in the long roots for the winter. Optimal shoot growth occurs with air temperatures of 55 to 75°F.

Cool-season root growth is stimulated by soil temperatures above 32°F, and is optimal with soil temperatures between 50 and 65°F.

When to schedule lawn maintenance

It is important to schedule your lawn care maintenance during times that match the life cycle of the turfgrass.

  • Do not add fertilizer too early in the spring. This may encourage the grass to grow during a time when it should be slow or dormant.
  • Do not spray to control weeds when temperatures are warm. This increases the likelihood of damaging the lawn.
  • Do not fertilize in hot mid-summer months. This can cause irreversible damage to your lawn.
  • Crabgrass doesn’t develop until late spring or early summer, so don’t apply herbicide used to prevent pre-emerging crabgrass in the fall.

See Water-saving strategies for home lawns for information on how and when to water.

Schedule for taking care of lawns and cool season grasses in Minnesota ]]>