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white spots on basil

Ask a Question forum: White speckles in basil plant leaves

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I would like to ask for your help about my basil plants. First of all they all come from cuttings which then were transplanted into pots with sterilized soil mixture (compost 70%, black peat 20%, perlite 5%, earth soil 5%, organic matter). This transfer from water to soil occured 1 to 1.5 months ago and since then enviromental temperature is generally high. Right now is 37 ˚C. However, there is no direct contact with sun. Now, the problem is that I can see white speckles on their leaves without any trace of insect on their leaves. If there is anyone who can understand from photos provided and make a diagnose, could you please inform me what is the cause and possibly what could be a treatment?

Thank you in advance

You may be overwatering.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming. “WOW What a Ride!!” -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org

As you can see below that photo, owner attributes the cause to leafhoppers.

Today I searched again for insects above and below my basil leaves, but initially I saw nothing. However, in the end I found 3 insects which seem like tiny grasshoppers with size around 3-4 mm. I used a sticky roller to catch them and then I took photos which I uploaded here (I croped them to focus on insect that’s why the bad analysis):

I also cite an original photo to better inspect the problem’s size as well as the size of insect related to that of leaf:

I believe it is a leafhopper or a thrip. What is your opinion and what would be a good and biological way of encountering this threat? Note that I would like to use basil leaves for making pesto for pasta.

By DE, do you mean Diatomaceous Earth?
If so I didn’t know that also comes as a spray.

The suggested ‘fix’ is insecticidal soap. It is made from naturally occurring fatty acids. In California, it is being sprayed from airplanes to try and control disease carrying mosquitoes.

Apparently, the juvenile leafhoppers are more susceptible and I know from experience that Insecticidal Soap only kills what it hits. So spraying will be an every couple days thing until the leafhoppers are gone.

The good thing about Insecticidal Soap, other than low toxicity, is that, because of the way it works, the suckybugs don’t build up a resistance to it. The bad thing is that there is no residual effect so you have to keep after the bugs.

But it might be better than trying to wash diatomaceous earth off your basil leaves.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming. “WOW What a Ride!!” -Mark Frost

Thread in the Ask a Question forum forum by avakas: Hello, I would like to ask for your help about my basil plants. First of all they all come from cutt…